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Presentations delivered at ANZMAC 2011

Members of ASPIRE2025 delivered two presentations at the 2011 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (ANZMAC), Marketing in the age of consumerism: Jekyll or Hyde?  The paper, ‘Jekyll and Hyde? Social Smokers’ Conflicted Identities’, won Best Paper Award in the Consumer Behaviour track.

Defending the Absurd? Interpretations of Smokers and Smoking

Abstract: Denormalising campaigns reframe smoking as an unappealing behaviour, more likely to lead to social exclusion than inclusion. Social identity theory suggests this strategy will reinforce smokefree norms and, as these become mainstream, decrease smoking prevalence. However, little is known about how these campaigns affect perceptions of smoking, or behaviour towards smokers. Themes identified following focus group discussions with smokers and non-smokers illustrated how non-smokers’ perception of smoking as illogical and self-destructive supported harsh reactions, including stigmatising behaviours that antagonised smokers. Evidence of empathy, particularly among those who recognised smoking’s addictiveness, suggests denormalising campaigns could also promote greater understanding of addiction. Such messages may reduce judgmental reactions that consolidate smokers’ identity and create environments that facilitate smokers’ transition from smoker to smokefree.

View the PowerPoint show: ANZMAC 2011: Defending the absurd?

Citation: McCool, J., Hoek, J. and Edwards, R. (2011). Defending the Absurd? Interpretations of Smokers and Smoking. In M. McCarthy, Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Perth, 28-30 November.

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Jekyll and Hyde? Social Smokers’ Conflicted Identities

Abstract: Social smoking has increased, particularly among young adults, yet remains poorly understood. Because social smokers define themselves as non-smokers, cessation messages fail to reach or resonate with them, leaving them vulnerable to harms they do not believe they face. To explore how social smokers reconcile their behaviour with their self-perception, we conducted depth interviews with twelve young adult social smokers. Findings highlight the demarcation strategies used to differentiate themselves from smokers, the pivotal role alcohol plays in facilitating smoking, and the deep internal conflicts they face as non-smokers who smoke. A simple policy intervention – extending the smokefree areas outside bars – elicited strong support and would help decouple social smokers’ Hyde-like behaviours from the identity to which they aspire.

View the PowerPoint show: ANZMAC 2011: Jekyll and Hyde

Citation: Hoek, J., Maubach, N., Stevenson, R., Edwards, R., & Gendall, P. (2011).  Jekyll and Hyde? Social Smokers’ Conflicted Identities.  In M. McCarthy, Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Perth, 28-30 November.